RSS Feed

‘Finger’ Category

  1. Climber’s Finger

    June 22, 2014 by Greg Balourdas

    Climber’s finger, like many injuries that can affect the hand and arm can occur from trauma but frequently develops from repetitive overuse.  Because of the cause and nature of the injury it is difficult for the individual to stop the activity to allow the needed time to heal.  With climber’s finger the problem develops from the forceful and repetitive use of one or more fingers, commonly the long finger for a fingertip hold.  The injury can range from inflammation to a significant injury to the small but crucial pulleys and sheath that support the flexor tendons in the finger.

    Pulley Rupture seen in Climber's finger

    Example of possible injuries seen in climbers.

    To slow the damage and inflammation, standard initial measures can help (ice, rest and activity restriction).  Taping encircling the middle section (middle phalynx) of the involved fingers can support the most commonly injured pulley.  If there is some relief in symptoms with these measures, then there is good reason to expect that with time the area will heal.  Hand therapy can help to control symptoms and encourage healing.  Such efforts are aimed at decreasing the inflammation while encouraging healing of any damaged structures.  If symptoms respond then the injury is partial and most likely at the inflammatory end of the spectrum of such injuries.

    With persistent pain and swelling, or if there is any sense that the tendon on the under surface of the finger is “loose” (pulls away from the finger like the line on a fishing rod when you’ve caught a big one!) more significant injury has likely occurred.  An expert evaluation is needed.  After examination by your hand specialist, an MRI scan or Ultrasound evaluation may be recommended in order to clarify the extent of injury.  The physical exam and imaging studies can determine what is inflamed and what might be torn.  If the injury to the pulley that supports the tendon is complete or near-complete then it cannot heal fully on its own and surgical reconstruction will be recommended.

    This information is provided on the basis of a presumed conditions: “climber’s finger”.  Many conditions can mimic the inflammation and swelling seen with climbing and my have different treatments and outcomes.

    Take care,

    Greg Balourdas, MD

    TheHandDoctor.com

     


  2. Texting Thumb and Repetitive Trauma

    August 14, 2012 by Greg Balourdas

    The conditions that we treat may not change much but the way that we injure ourselves changes with the technology.

    Take care that you don’t develop Texting Thumb.

    Recognized for a number of years and very treatable.

    Please don’t ignore your symptoms. And once in a while call!

     

     

    Such injuries from overuse include various tendonitis conditions and nerve entrapments (carpal tunnel syndrome etc.)  Many were recognized 100 years and more ago.

    Very interesting excerpt from a 1914 text on Occupational Disorders.  It goes on to describe conservative treatment similar to measures we employ today!  The more things change, the more they stay the same.

    From a textbook on Occupational Diseases published in 1914

    Check out the occupations associated with these conditions in 1914.  No texting to be found!

    And please don’t text and drive!

    Take Care,

    Greg Balourdas, MD

    TheHandDoctor.com


  3. I just jammed my finger Doc

    January 6, 2012 by Greg Balourdas

    Ok now that professional basketball season in underway.. I seem to be seeing an increase in “jammed” fingers. Probably just coincidence but when my son jammed his finger playing goalie it prompted me to start thinking about these injuries which do occur when flying spherical objects contact extended fingers as in “ball” sports (basketball, volleyball and soccer). I never fail to cringe when I see a patient who says there finger was jammed and crooked so they (or a teammate) pulled on it to straighten it! While this frequently works (there are a lot of jammed fingers out there that thankfully don’t make it to a surgeon’s office) when it doesn’t it can become a major problem. The joints of the fingers are actually quite complex and in delicate balance. One of the giants of Hand Surgery, J. Littler, called the extensor tendon function a “fugue of motion”, denoting a very complicated interaction of forces each dependent on the other to maintain balance and precise function.

    Suffice to say that some these structure and certain injury patterns are very benign and heal without problem but others do not.
    So look out the following “Red flags” that suggest problems may be lurking:
    1. Obvious, even slight, persistent angulation or lack of finger extension (doesn’t stay straight)
    2. Significant restriction in joint motion that does not improve over a few days.
    3. Grating or clicking sensation with motion.
    4. Pain that persists and if simple (“popsicle stick” splint) immobilization doesn’t give you relief.
    5. Numbness or tingling in the fingertip.

    By the way, Happy New Year and be careful out there!
    – Greg Balourdas, MD

    A little anatomy review:

    Anatomy of the Tendons and Joints of the Finger